Skip to navigation

Smart Matters

 
Get Connected on YaleNet.orgGet Connected on Massmind.com
Welcome To YaleNet - Boola Boola Bulldog Rules
get connected with your One Click Club
YaleNet is YOU - ADD CONTENT, browse or   Search -->
  
Why didn't Harper Lee ever write another book, after TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD? What did she see in Kansas, when she was with Truman Capote writing IN COLD BLOOD, that changed her life forever? Did the ghosts of the murdered Clutters ever visit the very people who brought them back to life? What made Truman Capote pick up the phone, in the final year of his life, and make one last call to his childhood best friend, now his almost bitter enemy? What does he say that sends her to a cemetery in the middle of the night -- where her family -- and their childhood secrets --are buried? If those questions intrigue you, then you'll want to read my new novel, CAPOTE IN KANSAS. It's a sort of "fantasia" about two of our greatest and most mysterious writers, and the inescapable memories that bind them together. But more than just a book about Capote and Lee, it's about all our childhoods: when you played barefoot outside, late into the night, or pretended there was a haunted house in the neighborhood, and didn't understand the grown-up world of adults and death -- or understood it all too well. Entertainment Weekly says: "Powers astutely summons the intense sorrow behind a life-long friendship gone awry." Publishers Weekly calls it "welcome", "offbeat" and intriguing." The Advocate calls it "dark and captivating." Pulitzer Prize winner Oscar Hijuelos writes: I thought I knew the story of Truman Capote and Harper Lee. I was wrong. Kim Powers brilliantly brings their strange relationship alive in a way a standard-issue biography never could. Weaving together fact, speculation and fantasy, he creates a sort of emotional biography that will haunt you long after the last page...just as the ghosts of the slain Clutters must have haunted them. CAPOTE IN KANSAS: A GHOST STORY In Bookstores Now The new novel by Kim Powers, YSD '84